Meet the Waterloo federal candidates Candidates battle for student votes — promises of changes to OSAP structure

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(alphabetically ordered)

Lori Campbell, NDP Director, UW Indigenous Student Centre

 

 

Lori Campbell is the first two-spirit,  Cree-Métis, woman to seek a seat in the House of Commons. Having worked all her life for the community and indigenous people, Campbell said she first realised that she wanted to get involved in politics when her grandmother reminded her that their ancestors always fought for justice and the rights of their people.

Campbell said she feels privileged to be in a place where she can do a lot more for her community. She said she believes this is her true calling and found that her beliefs coincide with the NDP’s vision.

Bardish Chagger, Liberal Party Member of Parliment, Waterloo

 

Bardish Chagger is the first female leader of the Government in the House of Commons.

She got involved in politics when she was 13 years old and was the president of the UW Young Liberals Club.

Chagger graduated from UW with a degree in science and aspirations to become a nurse, but she instead became an executive assistant to then-MP Andrew Telegdi.

Chagger’s love and dedication to the Waterloo has motivated her to seek re-election as she believes that there is still a lot more she can do for the community.

Kirsten Wright, Green Party Systems Design Engineer, PhD Candidate

Kirsten Wright moved to Waterloo when she started at UW School of Engineering. As a student, she built Canada’s first student think tank, The Forum for Independent Thought (FIT), to engage students in finding solutions to complex challenges.

Wright’s work in robotics and embedded systems has been well recognized and her passion for building a strong sustainable future led to her growing interest in politics.

Wright said she is focused on defining systemic weaknesses and creating a better future for her children and for the next generation of Waterloo residents.

Jerry Zhang, Conservative Party Entrpreneur

Jerry Zhang and his family have contributed to the Waterloo community in numerous ways for 15 years.

Zhang said he is family-oriented and credits his parents for teaching him to work hard. He said he feels responsible for giving his children and future generations of Waterloo residents the  same opportunities or better than he had.

“I want to do whatever I can do to preserve my little pieces of heaven,” Zhang said.

“I want to give back to Canada for all the doors it has opened for me and I want to start by transforming Waterloo,” he said.