Tech sexy to me: make love not porn

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As part of the highly revered interactive portion of the North by Northeast  (NXNE) festival, Cindy Gallop gave an hour-long talk June 19 in Toronto on her plans to disrupt the adult entertainment industry through her startup MakeLoveNotPorn.com and MakeLoveNotPorn.tv (MLNP).


MLNP deconstructs the differences between real world sex and pornographic sex for a generation whose sex­–ed came mostly from the internet, and allows users to submit intimate videos of themselves.


Gallop launched MLNP at TED2009, starting the website after realizing the real influence hardcore pornography was having on her relationships. Subsequently, the video went viral. Gallop granted <em>Imprint </em>an interview before her NXNE talk.


<strong>On curation</strong>:&nbsp; &ldquo;Porn lacks navigation and curation. There is no Yelp of porn &ndash; a billion dollar idea.&rdquo;


MLNP.tv content is titled, tagged, and curated by back-end staff.


The full features of MLNP will include the function to create playlists. Similar to creating a music playlist, visitors will be able to share their video playlists with their partners. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; MLNP also has a section on porn stars in an effort to contrast the sex they have on sets and their real world sex. Besides streaming content, the website was created to look SFW, thumbnails included.


<strong>On competitive collaboration instead of collaborative competition</strong>: &ldquo;What people don&rsquo;t realize is that everything that worries them about porn today is entirely driven by business issues and requires business solutions.&rdquo; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;


Collaborative competition happens when competitors in the sector compete for consumers by copying each other out of fear of going bankrupt. As a result, innovation suffers. It is a problem all industries face&ndash;music, publishing, broadcasting, advertising, and porn all have this in common.


The rise of hardcore pornography is not a testament to increasingly perverse viewer habits, but driven by the fear of content creators losing out on potential revenue. If the shock value of hardcore pornography is attracting hits, other production companies will copy.


<strong>On co&ndash;&shy;action and revenue sharing model</strong>: &#8232;For $5, visitors to the site can rent a video submitted by a MLNP star. Profits are then shared 50/50 with the content creator. Sex work is regarded as degrading but feeling degraded, and being in it for the money applies to all industries.


<strong>On the startup scene</strong>: &ldquo;Silicon Valley welcomes innovation and disruption in every other area of our lives except this one.&rdquo;


MLNP is tapping into a sector worth billions of dollars in a way that is socially beneficial, but it has yet to raise a series A (first round of significant venture funding). Gallop is out to capitalize on the money to be made by being the website for sex-ed (as an alternative to manufactured porn videos) and the place for dialogue on sexuality.


<strong>On socializing sex</strong>: &ldquo;Nobody should ever have to feel ashamed or embarrassed ever again about having a naked photograph or a sex tape of themselves posted on the internet.&rdquo;


Gallop and the team are setting out to make real-world sex socially acceptable and sharable. As a corollary, many things that have the potential to destroy human lives, such as revenge porn, will be defused.
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